Compound Movements

A compound movement can be defined as: Any exercise that engages two or more different joints to fully stimulate entire muscle groups and, indeed, multiple muscles.

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A major benefit of using compound, or multi-joint, lifts is the systemic stress they exert throughout the target muscles and neighboring areas (in the case of squats and deadlifts, the whole body is forced to work systemically, thus producing a system-wide, or total-body, effect).

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Also, when systemic stress is low, our muscles fail to benefit from a hormonal cascade (GH and testosterone) conducive to enhanced protein synthesis and greater muscular growth.

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Yet another reason for emphasizing compound movements over isolation (single-joint) exercises is the former’s ability to work more muscle overall, thereby eliminating the need to include excessive isolation work.

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This saves time and maximizes efficiency in the gym. More major muscle groups can be hit with a smaller number of exercises.

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While many gym-goers tend to prioritize isolation work over mass building movements (for example, front raises, bent laterals and side laterals may take precedence over overhead presses and incline presses), the smart ones favor compound lifts to save time, stimulate more muscle fibers and enhance recovery.

Via allmaxnutrition.com

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